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“FAMOUS JAZZ ARTIST SERIES” FEATURES NATIONAL AND CALIFORNIA CENTRAL COAST MUSIC TREASURES

2 Jan
Back: Red Holloway, Ernie Watts, Jay Graydon Front: Charlie and Sandi

Back: Red Holloway, Ernie Watts, Jay Graydon
Front: Charlie and Sandi

The “Famous Jazz Artist Series” was started in 1991 in San Luis Obispo County after renowned jazz vibraphonist, Charlie Shoemake, and his acclaimed vocalist wife, Sandi, moved to Cambria and noticed a dearth of major jazz artists performing on the Central Coast. How Charlie and Sandi ended up on the Central Coast is a fascinating tale. Growing up in Houston, Charlie developed a passion for both music and baseball, excelling in both. He was on the high school’s city championship baseball team, and attracted the attention of the St. Louis Cardinals. Initially he planned to pursue both in college, but then decided to really excel, he would need to focus on only one. So in 1956 he moved to Los Angeles to become involved in the jazz scene. In a proud aside, Charlie mentioned his grandson is now being drafted by a professional baseball team.

The 1950s were an exciting and inspirational period in Charlie’s music career as he honed his craft. He shared that he was particularly influenced by his informal studies with pianist Jimmy Rowles, as well as learning from the innovations of his idols Charlie Parker and Bud Powell and other talented innovators. Charlie eventually worked on the biographical film on American saxophonist, Charlie Parker released in 1988. During the 1950s, he met his future wife Sandi at a Si Zentner rehearsal, where Charlie was substituting for an absent band member.

Sandi’s path to a music career was influenced by her father who was a semiprofessional drummer-vocalist with Dixieland bands. As far back as she can remember, she wanted to be singer. To that end, in 1956 she enrolled in the acclaimed Los Angeles City College’s music department where she quickly rose to being a featured vocalist. After her second year of college, she was hired as a vocalist by trombonist Si Zentner’s Orchestra, which played various venues on the west coast, and was a regular attraction at the Hollywood Palladium. Sandi shared that she had a chance meeting with Charlie at a Si Zentner rehearsal; within two days they decided they would eventually marry, which they did in 1959.

During his early professional career, Charlie became a sought-after accompanist for well-known vocalists. He adoringly shared he has always enjoyed accompanying Sandi, but he felt many of the singers he was accompanying were not of her caliber. Thus Charlie decided to switch his musical focus to vibraphone, which he had begun playing in high school. For a year, he spent nearly every waking hour in exhausting practice. His efforts were rewarded in 1966 when he became the vibraphonist for the fabled George Shearing Quintet. George Shearing is a piano jazz legend,  best known for his composition Lullaby of Birdland, a jazz standard. Born poor and blind in London, George’s father delivered coal to Buckingham Palace. In 2007 George was knighted by the Queen of England in Buckingham Palace for his contribution to music.

During the year Charlie was honing his skills on the vibraphone, Sandi did studio work to help keep the family afloat. While Charlie was touring with the George Shearing Quintet, she was a staff vocalist at N.B.C. from 1965 to 1971, in addition to singing with other television shows including The Andy Williams Show, The Jerry Lewis Show, The Red Skelton Show, The Lennon Sisters-Jimmy Durante Show and specials for Bing Crosby, Doris Day, Dean Martin and others. She was particularly proud of her time performing with Nelson Riddle and his orchestra.

Charlie working with Barry Harris on movie "Bird"

Charlie working with Barry Harris on movie “Bird”

In 1973, driven by a desire for change and to be home more with his wife and son, Charlie opened a jazz improvisational school in Los Angeles. In spite of the widely-held belief that jazz improvisation couldn’t be taught, his school was a success. He was the only teacher at his eponymous school. By 1990, he had taught over 1500 students, with many students going onto successful careers including Ted Nash (trumpeter with the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis), Kye Palmer (trumpeter with the Tonight Show Orchestra and formerly with Woody Herman and Poncho Sanchez), Andy Martin (top jazz trombone recording artist), and smooth jazz artists Dave Koz and Richard Elliott. During a Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra (JLCO) at the Cal Poly Performing Arts Center in March 2013, Wynton Marsalis verbally recognized Charlie Shoemake, who was in attendance, as an important mentor and teacher to Ted Nash who was a featured soloist at the concert, and is the first person other than Wynton Marsalis to be a featured composer for the sensational orchestra. When asked about the recognition he received at the concert, Charlie stated, “I didn’t teach Ted Nash how to play, but what to play, how to improvise.”

Following the local JLCO performance, Ted was contacted by this writer for comments on his time studying with Charlie, and in spite of a busy performance schedule, he generously agreed. During the April 8, 2013 interview, Ted said he initially was trained classically on piano starting at age seven and clarinet at age 12. At age 13, Ted stated he started playing sax and was in the junior high jazz band. Ted’s high school jazz band director enthusiastically recommended studying with one of Charlie’s students. Ted’s father, (well-known jazz and studio trombonist, Dick Nash), decided that Ted should study jazz improvisation directly with Charlie. Charlie was very busy at the time bbut agreed to accept Ted as a student. Ted noted Charlie’s teaching method involved “memorizing transcribed music” from such jazz greats as Charlie Parker and Sonny Rollins. Ted stated that the 2 ½ to 3 years of studying with Charlie gave him a foundation that he still uses, even with “new improvisation and harmony.” When asked about his being the first composer for JLCO other than Wynton Marsalis, Ted replied that he was the first “featured” composer, although they had some prior visiting composers who had provided some arrangements. Ted noted that this Portrait in Seven Shades helped forge a new direction for JLCO. Although he did not mention it, Portrait in Seven Shades was a Grammy-nominated album representing seven different artists including Claude Monet, Salvador Dali, Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Vincent Van Gogh, Marc Chagall, and Jackson Pollock. On the Shoemake’s website, Ted is quoted, “When I began lessons, I could hardly play. Three years later, not only could I play, but I was working professionally with many groups, including Lionel Hampton, Toshiko Akiyoshi, and even Charlie’s own quintet….Charlie was the ONLY teacher in Los Angeles with a method of teaching jazz improvisation that actually worked.”

In the early 1990s, Charlie closed his school and relocated with Sandi to what he described as “the beautiful little ocean village of Cambria” where they began bringing in major jazz artists. During their two Sunday show times, Charlie accompanies the guest artists by playing piano or vibes and Sandi graces the stage for select vocals. The series was held at the Hamlet Restaurant in Cambria (which is currently under renovation), and is presently appearing at D’Anbino Vineyard and Cellars in Paso Robles. A list of the stellar artists who have performed at the series and more interesting information on Charlie and Sandi can be found on their website http://talsanmusic.com

Sounds of Shearing Tribute Group: Joe Bagg, Ron Anthony, Charlie Shoemake, Luther Hughes, Colin Bailey

Sounds of Shearing tribute group: Joe Bagg, Ron Anthony, Charlie Shoemake, Luther Hughes, Colin Bailey Courtesy: Bob Barry

When asked to share a humorous or interesting experience, Charlie said that due to an unavoidable delay due to a national crisis, the George Shearing Orchestra didn’t actually perform on television until two days after they were scheduled. Sleep-deprived due to the schedule changes, when the band was called back for an encore, the bassist forgot to take off his sunglasses. During a second encore all of the band members sported sunglasses, along with George, who regularly wore them due to being blind. Charlie added that when the band would arrive late for a gig, George would humorously say it was because he was driving.

Last year, instructors from the music departments at local Cal Poly and Cuesta College, both of which have outstanding music programs, approached Charlie to work with some of their students. To that end, the non-profit Central Coast Jazz Institute was recently established, which is “dedicated to the instruction and preservation of American jazz music.” Charlie spoke passionately about how the donated funds provide scholarships for jazz instruction of private students of all ages, as well as a lecture series.

courtesy: www.slojournal.com

Highlights of Cordoba and Sevilla

19 Jun

Here are some photos from a recent trip my son, Michael Marlen-Starr and I took in Cordoba and Sevilla. I highly recommend Cordoba, with its beautiful flowered patios; Roman, Muslim and Christian history; small town feel with friendly people and great food; plus live music and dance venues.

Patio of our Cordoba B&B

Roman temple at Cordoba

Mezquita: Cordoba

Narrowest street in Cordoba: Michael and me

Organ: Mezquita Cordoba

Roman bridge: Cordoba

Mezquita: Cordoba

Mezquita: Cordoba

King Alfonso: Alcazar Cordoba

Garden at Alcazar, Cordoba

After a short trip via train, we arrived for a short visit of Sevilla. Here is one view of the Cathedral of Sevilla

Stained glass window: Sevilla cathedral

Tomb of Christopher Columbus: Sevilla Cathedral

Former minaret at Sevilla cathedral

Visual Valencia

7 Apr

When my youngest son was visiting for the summer, we took a trip to nearby Valencia, the third largest city and Spain and the capital of the autonomous community of Valencia (Comunitat Valenciana, in the local Valenciana dialect.) Valencia was founded as a Roman colony in 138 BC, and has historical ruins from the Roman and Arab occupations.  I have also shared my recommendations in a blog post of the top 10 things to do in Valencia. But now, I want to share the visual delights of Valencia, from the beautiful historic buildings, the Lonja de la Seda  (Silk Exchange, built between 1482 and 1548, a UNESCO World Heritage Site), the mind-boggling architecture of the City of Arts and Sciences designed in part by native-born Santiago Calatrava, and, of course, street entertainers, and food at restaurants and in the famous Mercat Central (Valenciana for Central Market.)

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City of Arts and Sciences

City of Arts and Sciences

City of Arts and Sciences

City of Arts and Sciences

One of a number of exhibits at the City of Arts and Sciences

One of a number of exhibits at the City of Arts and Sciences

Ceiling of La Lonja de la Seda, originally painted blue with gold stars

Ceiling of La Lonja de la Seda, originally painted blue with gold stars

External window at La Lonja de la Seda with view of internal stained glass window

External window at La Lonja de la Seda with view of internal stained glass

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Valencia Central Market

Inside the Central Market

Inside the Central Market

Yummy offal

Yummy offal

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Spectacular array of vegetables

Delicious whole calamari

Delicious whole calamari

Jamon bellota at the venerable Casa Vela, since 1908

Jamon bellota at the venerable Casa Vela, since 1908

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Fun, Food and Music: Two Days in Javea

10 Dec

Altea

Travelling requires planning, and then when things go awry, flexibility. I love living here in Altea, on the Mediterranean, in Spain, but I also want to continue my life-long love of travelling to new places.

 

To that end, I have been looking to explore nearby destinations, and places further afield in Spain and beyond. However, from where I live, it is often not easily accessible to other areas of Spain, and beyond. The local tram, now over 100 years old, is a major way to travel from Altea to the north to Denia and to the south to Alicante, and destinations in between. It is about an hour by tram from Altea to Denia and two hours south to Alicante. However, the tram has been undergoing upgrades, and so now only runs to Calpe, three stops north of Altea, and then you need to transfer to a bus which substitutes for the tram. I was going to Javea, (aka Xàbia) a little less than an hour north of Altea. While dogs are allowed on the tram, when I went to the local tram station and asked if I could take my dog on the bus, (since it was a substitute for the tram), she called to ask her superiors. She told me it was not allowed.

Pepper (aka Pimienta)

So I had already made Pepper, (aka Pimienta) my small dog, a portable carrier/backpack incognito, by tacking on black scarfs inside on the netting, so I could “sneak” him onto bus public transport. But when I took the tram from Altea to Calpe, and tried to transfer to the bus for destinations north beyond, I was told I had to leave the backpack in the luggage hold in the bus, (which is the same as the animal transport policy for public buses in Spain.) I could not leave the dog in the soft backpack in the luggage hold.

 

So I had to regroup. I ended up taking a taxi to Javea, for 48 €. Originally I booked the Parador in Javea (paradors being historical buildings converted into hotels and restaurants), but the booking website incorrectly said they allowed dogs. Then I booked The Hotel Rodat, also a 4 star hotel.  It was a lovely hotel which reminded me much of hotels in the Santa Barbara area of California. Unfortunately for me, the dog-friendly rooms were down many stairs, (with no disabled access nor rails for the stairs) and no ability to eat in any of the hotel restaurants with your dog; in Spain, usually there is outdoor seating where pets are welcomed. I was planning to eat at their 1 Michelin star restaurant. The room service only had a limited menu, and did not include any dishes from the Michelin-starred restaurant and very few from the more casual dining restaurant. A dog-friendly hotel where you cannot eat at any of the restaurants? No bueno.

Thus I proceeded to the L’Arenal beachside region of Javea where I enjoyed some snacks of berberechos and lobster soup at Fontana Restaurant. The outdoor covered roof with gas heaters allowed a cozy view of the beach walkway and all of its activities. Afterwards, I walked about two miles to the port to Varadero restaurant and bar where Destry Spigner, a local blues and soul singer was performing. In addition to enjoying his performance, I had a tasty snack of Spanish cheese and hams.

berberechos-e1512931392598.jpg

berberechos

After a restful night’s sleep, I enjoyed the garden area outside my room while Pepper played fetch. I then returned to Los Remos, a restaurant which had an enticing menu that I had seen the previous day, but was unable to eat at as the kitchen was closed after 4:00 p.m. until the dinner service. I am glad I returned as I had one of the best meals I have had in Spain, (bogavante azul) and superb mixed sautéed vegetables. While dining, I watched the busy beach area, with youngsters getting surf lessons (although there was hardly any surf), families walking and playing, and dogs running on the beach (which is not allowed in the summer, but tolerated in the winter.) Happy and sated with my outing, I returned to Altea via taxi, for the same 48€ that it cost me to get to Javea from Calpe.

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blue lobster (bogavante azul)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BIZARRE BIZET

30 Nov
View from our seats at La Fenice

View from our seats at La Fenice

When the curtains opened in Venice’s opulent La Fenice Opera House for Bizet’s Carmen, I immediately became suspect that something was wrong. On stage was a telephone booth; I was certain there were no phone booths when Carmen was first performed in 1875. As lovers of live music, we had already searched out the secluded Venice Jazz Club where we enjoyed samba and bossa nova music, attended an intimate chamber orchestra playing Vivaldi’s Four Seasons in old prison connected to the Palazzo Ducale (Doge’s Palace), listened to live jazz at the Hotel Cipriani, and ended every evening listening to live music on the Piazza San Marco.

While looking for other live musical performances, we were excited to learn that Carmen would be performed at the recently rebuilt Teatro La Fenice. We immediately walked to the Opera House in hopes of securing tickets for that night’s performance. We succeeded in getting two tickets in the coveted lower loge seats which are directly across from the stage, high enough to prevent obstructed views from taller patrons.

La Fenice is one of the most famous theatres in Europe. The San Benedetto Theatre, as it was originally known, saw its first performance in the early 1700’s, but was destroyed by fire and later forced to move due to a legal dispute. When the new theatre was opened in 1792, it was aptly named La Fenice, which means The Phoenix. The theatre suffered two more fires, the last an arson by two electricians in 1996. It reopened in November 2004.

On the evening of the performance we were attending, we donned our finest apparel and walked with anticipation to La Fenice. We wandered the beautiful building before taking our seats. We had previously seen Carmen and were excited to see it in Venice. Once the opera started, it quickly became apparent this was not the traditional Carmen we expected. While we were trying to digest the phone booth and more contemporary set and costumes, during the opening march, a man ran around in circles in his underwear carrying a gun. This version of Carmen was represented to be set in a contemporary fascist era. During one particularly bizarre part, the cast pulled a Christmas tree from the trunk of an old Mercedes Benz, and proceeded to assemble and decorate it. While the adults and children were decorating the tree, a female prostitute engaged in salacious simulated sexual activity, with the children present. Carmen ultimately pulled off and held up her bright red panties, which were hoisted up the flagpole. Several times I closed my eyes to disrupt the visual assault on my senses; with closed eyes I could enjoy the spectacular vocals. However, every time I opened my eyes the bizarre set and shenanigans interfered with my ability to enjoy the opera. I suspected my son, an artistic soul who has experience in the performance arts, would be more receptive.

By the intermission, I determined that in spite of the fantastic singing, I couldn’t take it any longer and decided to return to the Hotel Cipriani for more ego-syntonic jazz. To my surprise, my son concurred with my Carmen experience and decided to join me. In retrospect, I wondered if there was any way I could have known this was a non-traditional version of Carmen, but realized there was nothing in the advertisements or communication from the theatre ticket staff that telegraphed this unusual interpretation, so I just chalked it up to another laughable travel memory.

BEST VACATIONS: SAN DIEGO

18 Nov

Recently, some of my favorite haunts in my hometown of San Diego have been mentioned by friends or in the news, so I am re-posting, (with a bit of editing) my article about The Hotel del Coronado and other fun activities in the San Diego area. The outside of the hotel, built in 1888, provided the background for the famous movie, Some Like It Hot starring Marilyn Monroe, Tony Curtis, and Jack Lemmon. The movie looped, playing continuously in our hotel room when we were there. The Crown Room was considered an architectural achievement spanning 160 feet by 60 feet, without any pillars to interrupt the view. The 33 foot high ceiling is paneled in beautiful Oregon sugar pine. Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum is credited for designing the famous crown chandeliers, which were installed c. 1911. In 1920, an enormous banquet was held here for England’s Prince of Wales, and in 1927 Charles Lindbergh was honored with his own celebration after his successful solo trans-Atlantic flight. Today, the Crown Room has a tradition of elegance and continues to play host to a spectacular Sunday Brunch, consistently rated as the best in the San Diego area.

Relaxing on the deck of your deck of my roomy villa, I sip my morning coffee while the cool mist clears, revealing the adjacent expansive sandy beach in Coronado, California. Then we proceed to the comfortable, beach side Windsor Cottage for complimentary continental-style breakfast. Concierge staff is available to help with restaurant and activity recommendations and reservations. Afterwards we either proceed to the reserved beach space for summer villa guests or the kids go to the children and teen activities. This is the way each day can start while staying at Beach Village at The Del. Staff at the beach will provide lounge chairs, towels, umbrellas, sand toys, food and beverages. This is pampering at its best. Coronado Beach is often rated as one of the best in the world, especially for families. It is a large un-crowded sandy beach with gentle waves good for kids or first time surfers.

Beach Village is among my top three favorite hotels in the world. The newer cottages and villas are adjacent to the historic Hotel Del Coronado, (called “The Del” by we San Diego natives), which dates back to 1888. Beach Village rooms have a casual, yet luxurious beach side vibe. Our family has stayed in the same corner room during our annual summer weekly visits, dating back to the first year it opened. We chose a two bedroom suite, which had one large bedroom with a king bed, and the other with two queens. Each of the bedrooms has its own fireplace and elegant bathroom. There is also a central living area with a gourmet kitchen, dining room and living room area; the couch in the living room has a fold out bed. All of the many activities, pools, dining and drink venues, and children/teen activities of the main hotel are available to those at the Beach Village, but not the reverse. Beach Village has many small private pools dotting the grounds, in addition to its community pool.  Beach Village is expensive, but less costly accommodations are available in the historic part of The Del, with many of the same perks.

Beach Village at The Del (Credit: Flickr)

Beach Village at The Del (Credit: Flickr)

Daytime fun is at hand with surfing, paddle boarding, boating, biking, and fitness classes. There are a variety of venues for drinks and music at The Del. Seasonal music, beverages and casual fare are available at the Sun Deck Bar and Grill which boasts a great view from its second story outdoor setting. Babcock & Story Bar, named after the founders of The Del, features a 46 foot hand-crafted Mahogany Bar which came to the hotel by way of Cape Horn in 1888. The Bar offers seasonal entertainment, snacks, light meals, beverages, and televisions for watching sporting events. I am still upset that they removed the grand piano where they had weekly jazz and R&B frequented by locals and guests; they replaced the area with a bakery case. At sunset, for a fee, Beach Village guests can get drinks and a snack at the Windsor Cottage while enjoying the table top built-in fire pits. S’mores on the beach after dark can be a memorable experience for families or couples. During the day, be prepared for the roar, and I do mean ear-piercing decibels, of the military jets coming into land over Coronado’s beach at the adjacent Naval Air Station. Some find it entertaining, and the rest of us annoying.

Allosaurus at the San Diego Natural History Museum

Allosaurus at the San Diego Natural History Museum

During our week stay, we eventually tear ourselves away from The Del to enjoy San Diego’s many other offerings. I always take my kids to at least one fun and one educational activity, which sometimes are both. One of our favorite activities is to go to historic Balboa Park where the 1915-16 Panama-California Exposition and the 1935-36 California Pacific International Exposition were held. The Park has numerous museums, with the San Diego Natural History Museum (great dinosaur exhibit when we have been there), San Diego Air and Space Museum, Reuben H. Fleet Science Center, San Diego Museum of Art (small but quality 19th and 20th century art and interesting special exhibits), and the Sam Diego Model Railroad Museum. The park has many interesting plants and gardens, including the 1935 Old Cactus Garden, Botanical Garden (check for closed days), and California Native Plant Garden. There are five children’s play areas and three dog parks. Of course, there is the world famous San Diego Zoo, and for an experience with animals in a more natural environment, head a half hour north to the Wild Animal Park. Sea World is educational, interactive place for the kids to learn about sea life. They also offer a play structure in Sesame Street Bay of Play, in case the kids aren’t exhausted enough. Legoland, about 45 minutes north of Coronado, is great for younger kids. Wait to buy any of the Lego construction kits until you are ready to leave the park.

Old Point Loma Lighthouse at Cabrillo National Monument

Old Point Loma Lighthouse at Cabrillo National Monument

Cabrillo National Monument is the place where Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo stepped onto the shore in 1542, becoming the first European to set foot on the West Coast of the United States. In addition to information about Cabrillo, the area hiking trails, tide pools, the Old Point Loma Lighthouse, and the military history of Fort Roscrans. The area that is now Presidio Park and Old Town was home to the first European settlement on the West Coast which started in 1769. There are no original structures left. It was the first in a series of presidios and Catholic missions in California which were used in Spanish colonization. The first mission was later moved a few miles away on the aptly-named Friars Road. The Junipero Serra Museum is in the park and is dedicated to the history of San Diego.

Gaslamp Quarter

Gaslamp Quarter

Head back over the Coronado Bridge, or for more fun, take the ferry from Coronado Bay to the nearby historic Gaslamp Quarter in downtown San Diego to sample the many restaurants and see historical buildings including the ornate former Oyster Bar run by Wyatt Earp after the shootout at the OK Corral. There are many great jazz and live music venues in the Gaslamp, but most do not allow kids. If you took the ferry to downtown, you can make the U.S.S. Midway Museum on the harbor your last stop before heading back to Coronado. Kids and military buffs enjoy touring the immense air craft carrier.

Del Mar Race Track

Del Mar Race Track

We love going to the Del Mar Race Track. I give each of my sons a set amount of money, an average of $2.00 for every race, and then let them decide how they want to bet it. When they were minors, I would place the bets for them. Our friend who previously owned race horses scoured the handicapping analyses to inform his bets, but my son who just went to look at the horses being paraded in the paddock just before they raced was far more successful. Last time all of the boys donned their 1940s suits and fedoras-they were a hit with the crowd. We like to sit trackside in one of the reserved dining areas which has table service. It can be quite sunny so sunscreen, and protective clothing and head attire are important. Afterwards, we stop for a snack or light dinner on the beach in Del Mar or La Jolla, and then back to our Coronado retreat.

Shells from the Del

Shells from Beach Village at the Del

If you want beach weather, the best time to visit the San Diego area is from the beginning of July, so you won’t be subject to the “May and June gloom,” to mid-October. This will be one of your most memorable, fun family vacations ever. Beach Village offers packages and seasonal discounts, or you can stay in the main building or one of the many other family-friendly San Diego hotels. If you can afford Beach Village, it is worth the splurge.   I love the assortment of shells they leave in the room each evening and have them displayed in my home so that I can be regularly reminded of those wonderful trips.

Quality, Bargain Travel within Europe

8 May

Water Wheel: Treviso

While I loved my new life as an ex-pat in the lovely Mediterranean village of Altea, Spain, I relish the opportunity to affordably travel to other destinations. For my most recent trip, I went to Venice, Paris, then back to where I live, with all three flights costing only 150 Euros.

 

There are many low-cost options available for transportation and accommodations. My original plan was to go to central Spain to the historic, beautiful and interesting cities of Salamanca (with arguably the most beautiful plaza in Spain), Segovia (with its intact Roman Aqueduct), and Avila (with its intact medieval city wall), all UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Spain has the second most UNESCO World Heritage Sites, after China.

 

Piazza San Marco

However, getting to those locations from where I live is not easy to do in a timely manner via train or flight. I did not want to rent a car or take ride-sharing Bla Bla Car. As I did not want to spend many hours to get to my destinations, I looked at the direct (non-stop) flights that departed and arrived from the two airports closest to me, Valencia and Alicante. Originally I found direct flights from my preferred airport of Alicante to many destinations, and I decided to go to Venice, then Paris, then home to Alicante airport. I also checked for airlines and hotels that accepted dogs, as I initially planned to take my small dog, Pepper. I subsequently decided not to take him because it would preclude us from going to events like the ballet in Paris, or restaurants which have only indoor seating.

 

Often flight, bus and other transportation schedules within Spain and Europe are not published until a few months before departure. Whereas my initial search found direct flights from Alicante to Venice, when I went to book it, there were no scheduled flights for March, none until July. Being flexible and willing to search for other options can yield reasonable alternatives. I was going to meet my son in Venice on a Sunday in March, and all the flights with more than one leg took a ridiculous length of time. I then found a flight the prior day, a Saturday, to Treviso, which is only a mere 30 minutes train ride to the Venice train terminal for only 3,40 Euros. I decided to get a hotel in Treviso, “The City of Art and Water,” that Saturday and explore the town, which has interesting history and culture. The next day, I strolled around town before heading to Venice. Of course, I had researched, and where necessary, scheduled all the connecting ground transportation for the whole trip. That was not necessary for the train from Treviso to Venice. In Italy, (and some other European countries), after you purchase your ticket, you must validate it in one of the machines on the wall or you risk getting a large fine when they train staff check your ticket.

 

As private water taxis are very expensive in Venice, as are taxies in Paris, I scheduled them on Alilaguna, a group water taxi for about 14 Euros one way and 25 Euros roundtrip, and Blacklane for a roundtrip private transfer from Paris Orly airport to our hotel in the Plaza Vendôme area for about 50 Euros each way.

 

One unexpected issue we had on the flight from Venice to Paris on Transavia was just as we got to the staff to present our boarding passes we were told we could only have one carry-on, and that we would have to put any other items including my purse in my carry-on suitcase, which was already stuffed full. I had to throw out a few items in order for my purse to fit. All three flights were about two hours. It was the first time I had taken low cost airlines, and found them organized, and comfortable enough.

 

We enjoyed stops in historic churches, art museums, live music venues, and public gardens. Included in this article are some of the interesting sites we saw on this trip.

 

For me, one of the many considerations, albeit not the most major, in making a decision to move to Spain was the ease and cost of travelling to relatively nearby European and African countries.