Tag Archives: ballet

Quality, Bargain Travel within Europe

8 May

Water Wheel: Treviso

While I loved my new life as an ex-pat in the lovely Mediterranean village of Altea, Spain, I relish the opportunity to affordably travel to other destinations. For my most recent trip, I went to Venice, Paris, then back to where I live, with all three flights costing only 150 Euros.

 

There are many low-cost options available for transportation and accommodations. My original plan was to go to central Spain to the historic, beautiful and interesting cities of Salamanca (with arguably the most beautiful plaza in Spain), Segovia (with its intact Roman Aqueduct), and Avila (with its intact medieval city wall), all UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Spain has the second most UNESCO World Heritage Sites, after China.

 

Piazza San Marco

However, getting to those locations from where I live is not easy to do in a timely manner via train or flight. I did not want to rent a car or take ride-sharing Bla Bla Car. As I did not want to spend many hours to get to my destinations, I looked at the direct (non-stop) flights that departed and arrived from the two airports closest to me, Valencia and Alicante. Originally I found direct flights from my preferred airport of Alicante to many destinations, and I decided to go to Venice, then Paris, then home to Alicante airport. I also checked for airlines and hotels that accepted dogs, as I initially planned to take my small dog, Pepper. I subsequently decided not to take him because it would preclude us from going to events like the ballet in Paris, or restaurants which have only indoor seating.

 

Often flight, bus and other transportation schedules within Spain and Europe are not published until a few months before departure. Whereas my initial search found direct flights from Alicante to Venice, when I went to book it, there were no scheduled flights for March, none until July. Being flexible and willing to search for other options can yield reasonable alternatives. I was going to meet my son in Venice on a Sunday in March, and all the flights with more than one leg took a ridiculous length of time. I then found a flight the prior day, a Saturday, to Treviso, which is only a mere 30 minutes train ride to the Venice train terminal for only 3,40 Euros. I decided to get a hotel in Treviso, “The City of Art and Water,” that Saturday and explore the town, which has interesting history and culture. The next day, I strolled around town before heading to Venice. Of course, I had researched, and where necessary, scheduled all the connecting ground transportation for the whole trip. That was not necessary for the train from Treviso to Venice. In Italy, (and some other European countries), after you purchase your ticket, you must validate it in one of the machines on the wall or you risk getting a large fine when they train staff check your ticket.

 

As private water taxis are very expensive in Venice, as are taxies in Paris, I scheduled them on Alilaguna, a group water taxi for about 14 Euros one way and 25 Euros roundtrip, and Blacklane for a roundtrip private transfer from Paris Orly airport to our hotel in the Plaza Vendôme area for about 50 Euros each way.

 

One unexpected issue we had on the flight from Venice to Paris on Transavia was just as we got to the staff to present our boarding passes we were told we could only have one carry-on, and that we would have to put any other items including my purse in my carry-on suitcase, which was already stuffed full. I had to throw out a few items in order for my purse to fit. All three flights were about two hours. It was the first time I had taken low cost airlines, and found them organized, and comfortable enough.

 

We enjoyed stops in historic churches, art museums, live music venues, and public gardens. Included in this article are some of the interesting sites we saw on this trip.

 

For me, one of the many considerations, albeit not the most major, in making a decision to move to Spain was the ease and cost of travelling to relatively nearby European and African countries.

 

 

 

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WATCHING BALLET FROM A BATHTUB IN PARIS’ OPERA HOUSE

29 Jul
Paris Opera House: Palais Garnier

Paris Opera House:
Palais Garnier

Always excited at the prospect of watching world-class ballet performed in a historic, opulent opera house, I quickly became perplexed and frustrated when the translated Paris’ Palais Garnier website offered seating in the “bathtub.” My French is limited to the most important things-ordering food and wine. The Parisian Opera House did not allow any outside assistance, such a ticketing agency or concierge assistance, so I was left to my own designs  to figure out the seating on my own, (which was further hampered by my wanting technological skills.)

I finally found a feature that, when clicked on, showed the view of the stage from those chosen seats, or at least that is what I hoped. Left with no other choice, I clicked the “purchase” button and nervously hoped for the best.

Le Grand Foyer

Le Grand Foyer

When we eventually arrived at the grand venue of the Opera House a few months later, we sipped the obligatory champagne, admired the elegant beaux-arts design, and then proceeded up the stairs to see what awaited us. We entered a private door into a vestibule where we left our wraps, and then proceeded to the red velvet splendor of our private seating area.

As I eventually learned, the bagnoire translates into English, not only to bathtub, but also to the lowest seats in a small box seating area at an opera house.  Relieved, we had a good laugh, another glass of champagne, and settled into our “bathtub”  to enjoy the ethereal, mesmerizing ballet.