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Visions of Altea

21 May

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Food Porn from the Costa Blanca: Altea, Albir, Alfaz and Benidorm

23 Apr

Perro Negro: Altea, bacalao with clams (bacalao con almejas)

Interrmezzo: Albir, lobster and mussels in Thai sauce (bogavante y mejillones en salsa Thai)

Tragantua Gran Taberna: Benidorm, octopus in garlic olive oil (pulpo al ajillo)

La Capella: Altea, Jamon bellota iberico

La Favorita Taberna: Benidorm, tapa with serrano ham, crab and shrimp (tapa con jamon serrano, cangrejo y gamba)

Sabor: Altea, carpaccio

Cerveceria Casa Juan: Alfaz, asparagus tortilla (tortilla con espárrago)

La Maja: Altea, cod on black rice (bacalao con arroz negro)

Blau Bellaguarda: Altea, roasted lamb with roasted veggies (cordero al horno con verduras asadas)

House of Jarl, Altea, brunch with paté, chorizo, perfectly cooked egg, cheeses, salad, potato with creme fraiche and dill

Rainbow seen from La Maja restaurant in Altea
3-17-18 (arcoiris)

Visual Valencia

7 Apr

When my youngest son was visiting for the summer, we took a trip to nearby Valencia, the third largest city and Spain and the capital of the autonomous community of Valencia (Comunitat Valenciana, in the local Valenciana dialect.) Valencia was founded as a Roman colony in 138 BC, and has historical ruins from the Roman and Arab occupations.  I have also shared my recommendations in a blog post of the top 10 things to do in Valencia. But now, I want to share the visual delights of Valencia, from the beautiful historic buildings, the Lonja de la Seda  (Silk Exchange, built between 1482 and 1548, a UNESCO World Heritage Site), the mind-boggling architecture of the City of Arts and Sciences designed in part by native-born Santiago Calatrava, and, of course, street entertainers, and food at restaurants and in the famous Mercat Central (Valenciana for Central Market.)

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City of Arts and Sciences

City of Arts and Sciences

City of Arts and Sciences

City of Arts and Sciences

One of a number of exhibits at the City of Arts and Sciences

One of a number of exhibits at the City of Arts and Sciences

Ceiling of La Lonja de la Seda, originally painted blue with gold stars

Ceiling of La Lonja de la Seda, originally painted blue with gold stars

External window at La Lonja de la Seda with view of internal stained glass window

External window at La Lonja de la Seda with view of internal stained glass

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Valencia Central Market

Inside the Central Market

Inside the Central Market

Yummy offal

Yummy offal

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Spectacular array of vegetables

Delicious whole calamari

Delicious whole calamari

Jamon bellota at the venerable Casa Vela, since 1908

Jamon bellota at the venerable Casa Vela, since 1908

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Four Days of No Running Water in Altea Spain: NO BUENO!

18 Feb

Altea fountain with fresh water

Day 4 with no running water in my apartment in Altea Spain. (No bueno.) Initially, I inquired of my two neighbors in the same building had water and they did not. My contacts with the property manager, Pacqui, at Ibis Inmobliaria, were unbelievably frustrating and unprofessional.

 

When I told her I did not have water for two days, she asked if I had paid the bill, even though the bill goes to her office, and then I pay it every month, so she should have known that. Then she asked if the neighbor had water and when I said no, she advised me to go to the water company for info. My Spanish is pretty good about daily matters but more challenging when trying to communicate about uncommon things. I asked here via text several more times, and she dismissively replied in Spanish that something must be broken. So when will I have water, I asked her in Spanish, and she said when it is fixed, and have a nice day with a smiley emoji. In spite of my repeated requests for information, she never gave me any idea what was wrong or when I would have water. Even when I told her I would look for a new apartment because I could not function without water or without knowing when I would have it, she did not respond.

 

Too bad I had recently just gotten rid my cupboards of all the empty bottles which I could have used to get water from the local fountains, which fortunately provide potable drinking water at many spots around town.

 

Finally, I found the emergency water hotline which I called on day 4. They asked me the same questions several times, i.e. how long have you been without water, and are your neighbors without water. Then they asked me why no one had reported it; apparently neither the property manager nor the neighbor who runs a barbershop bothered to call. During that time, I observed a man working on the street on a pipe, and about half an hour after my call I had water, but I think the restoration of water was a coincidence, not due to my call. After that, the water company called back and informed me the water would again be shut off for more repairs in three days, which although inconvenient, but I can handle it with advance info.

The lack of customer service and difficulty in accomplishing bureaucratic or business tasks is one of the most frustrating things about living in Spain. It took me almost two and half months to change my internet provider. You can’t just walk into a store and buy a cell phone, nor just cancel a service and return the equipment. And don’t be surprised if what they tell you to do is different each time you go back trying to fulfill their last requirement.  All that said, I still love my life here in Spain, in spite of the occasional frustrations.

16 of My Favorite Spanish Foods

6 Jan

I have decided to revisit some of my favorite meals and foods here in the Costa Blanca area of Spain:

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First course beachside at La Maja

grilled artichokes

grilled artichokes

Chopitos (fried baby squid)

Chopitos (fried baby squid)

Flan

Flan

Composed salad with goat cheese

Composed salad with goat cheese

Cocido con pelotas (traditional regional favorite)

Cocido con pelotas (traditional regional favorite)

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Sample of tapas served complimentarily with wine or beer

Paté plate

Paté plate

Seafood salad

Salad with cheese and ham

John Dory fish with salad and fries

John Dory fish with salad and fries

Sautéed fish with veggies in saffron sauce

Sautéed fish with veggies in saffron sauce

Seafood salad

Seafood salad

Jamon

Jamon

Grilled octopus

Grilled octopus

Pimientos de padron

Pimientos de padron

Paella with rabbit and calamari

Paella with rabbit and calamari

 

 

 

Fun, Food and Music: Two Days in Javea

10 Dec

Altea

Travelling requires planning, and then when things go awry, flexibility. I love living here in Altea, on the Mediterranean, in Spain, but I also want to continue my life-long love of travelling to new places.

 

To that end, I have been looking to explore nearby destinations, and places further afield in Spain and beyond. However, from where I live, it is often not easily accessible to other areas of Spain, and beyond. The local tram, now over 100 years old, is a major way to travel from Altea to the north to Denia and to the south to Alicante, and destinations in between. It is about an hour by tram from Altea to Denia and two hours south to Alicante. However, the tram has been undergoing upgrades, and so now only runs to Calpe, three stops north of Altea, and then you need to transfer to a bus which substitutes for the tram. I was going to Javea, (aka Xàbia) a little less than an hour north of Altea. While dogs are allowed on the tram, when I went to the local tram station and asked if I could take my dog on the bus, (since it was a substitute for the tram), she called to ask her superiors. She told me it was not allowed.

Pepper (aka Pimienta)

So I had already made Pepper, (aka Pimienta) my small dog, a portable carrier/backpack incognito, by tacking on black scarfs inside on the netting, so I could “sneak” him onto bus public transport. But when I took the tram from Altea to Calpe, and tried to transfer to the bus for destinations north beyond, I was told I had to leave the backpack in the luggage hold in the bus, (which is the same as the animal transport policy for public buses in Spain.) I could not leave the dog in the soft backpack in the luggage hold.

 

So I had to regroup. I ended up taking a taxi to Javea, for 48 €. Originally I booked the Parador in Javea (paradors being historical buildings converted into hotels and restaurants), but the booking website incorrectly said they allowed dogs. Then I booked The Hotel Rodat, also a 4 star hotel.  It was a lovely hotel which reminded me much of hotels in the Santa Barbara area of California. Unfortunately for me, the dog-friendly rooms were down many stairs, (with no disabled access nor rails for the stairs) and no ability to eat in any of the hotel restaurants with your dog; in Spain, usually there is outdoor seating where pets are welcomed. I was planning to eat at their 1 Michelin star restaurant. The room service only had a limited menu, and did not include any dishes from the Michelin-starred restaurant and very few from the more casual dining restaurant. A dog-friendly hotel where you cannot eat at any of the restaurants? No bueno.

Thus I proceeded to the L’Arenal beachside region of Javea where I enjoyed some snacks of berberechos and lobster soup at Fontana Restaurant. The outdoor covered roof with gas heaters allowed a cozy view of the beach walkway and all of its activities. Afterwards, I walked about two miles to the port to Varadero restaurant and bar where Destry Spigner, a local blues and soul singer was performing. In addition to enjoying his performance, I had a tasty snack of Spanish cheese and hams.

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berberechos

After a restful night’s sleep, I enjoyed the garden area outside my room while Pepper played fetch. I then returned to Los Remos, a restaurant which had an enticing menu that I had seen the previous day, but was unable to eat at as the kitchen was closed after 4:00 p.m. until the dinner service. I am glad I returned as I had one of the best meals I have had in Spain, (bogavante azul) and superb mixed sautéed vegetables. While dining, I watched the busy beach area, with youngsters getting surf lessons (although there was hardly any surf), families walking and playing, and dogs running on the beach (which is not allowed in the summer, but tolerated in the winter.) Happy and sated with my outing, I returned to Altea via taxi, for the same 48€ that it cost me to get to Javea from Calpe.

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blue lobster (bogavante azul)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BIZARRE BIZET

30 Nov
View from our seats at La Fenice

View from our seats at La Fenice

When the curtains opened in Venice’s opulent La Fenice Opera House for Bizet’s Carmen, I immediately became suspect that something was wrong. On stage was a telephone booth; I was certain there were no phone booths when Carmen was first performed in 1875. As lovers of live music, we had already searched out the secluded Venice Jazz Club where we enjoyed samba and bossa nova music, attended an intimate chamber orchestra playing Vivaldi’s Four Seasons in old prison connected to the Palazzo Ducale (Doge’s Palace), listened to live jazz at the Hotel Cipriani, and ended every evening listening to live music on the Piazza San Marco.

While looking for other live musical performances, we were excited to learn that Carmen would be performed at the recently rebuilt Teatro La Fenice. We immediately walked to the Opera House in hopes of securing tickets for that night’s performance. We succeeded in getting two tickets in the coveted lower loge seats which are directly across from the stage, high enough to prevent obstructed views from taller patrons.

La Fenice is one of the most famous theatres in Europe. The San Benedetto Theatre, as it was originally known, saw its first performance in the early 1700’s, but was destroyed by fire and later forced to move due to a legal dispute. When the new theatre was opened in 1792, it was aptly named La Fenice, which means The Phoenix. The theatre suffered two more fires, the last an arson by two electricians in 1996. It reopened in November 2004.

On the evening of the performance we were attending, we donned our finest apparel and walked with anticipation to La Fenice. We wandered the beautiful building before taking our seats. We had previously seen Carmen and were excited to see it in Venice. Once the opera started, it quickly became apparent this was not the traditional Carmen we expected. While we were trying to digest the phone booth and more contemporary set and costumes, during the opening march, a man ran around in circles in his underwear carrying a gun. This version of Carmen was represented to be set in a contemporary fascist era. During one particularly bizarre part, the cast pulled a Christmas tree from the trunk of an old Mercedes Benz, and proceeded to assemble and decorate it. While the adults and children were decorating the tree, a female prostitute engaged in salacious simulated sexual activity, with the children present. Carmen ultimately pulled off and held up her bright red panties, which were hoisted up the flagpole. Several times I closed my eyes to disrupt the visual assault on my senses; with closed eyes I could enjoy the spectacular vocals. However, every time I opened my eyes the bizarre set and shenanigans interfered with my ability to enjoy the opera. I suspected my son, an artistic soul who has experience in the performance arts, would be more receptive.

By the intermission, I determined that in spite of the fantastic singing, I couldn’t take it any longer and decided to return to the Hotel Cipriani for more ego-syntonic jazz. To my surprise, my son concurred with my Carmen experience and decided to join me. In retrospect, I wondered if there was any way I could have known this was a non-traditional version of Carmen, but realized there was nothing in the advertisements or communication from the theatre ticket staff that telegraphed this unusual interpretation, so I just chalked it up to another laughable travel memory.